Ancient Corinth and Corinth Canal Half Day Tour

Ancient Corinth and Corinth Canal Half Day TourStarting from Athens we will drive southwards on the national highway.

Towards the industrial city of Elepfsis home of the ancient Elefsinian mysteries. During the ride along the seaside you will see some Greek seaside villages and the island of Salamis (where the historical naval battle between the Athenian and the Persians took place).

Our first stop will be at Corinth canal one of Greece’s most important engineering feats.

The canal connects the Aegean Sea (east) with the Ionian Sea (west) it was opened in 1892 and separates the Peloponnese peninsula from the rest of Greece.

You can walk along the pedestrian bridge where the view is breathtaking.

Continuing 7km from the canal at the base of the hill lays the city of Ancient Corinth where St. Paul lived and preached for two years. At the top of the hill the acropolis of Corinth (Acrocorinth) rises about 600m above sea level.

You will visit the agora, a small museum and one of the most outstanding monuments of pre-Roman Period the temple of the god Apollo.

Leaving the site you can have lunch at a traditional Greek tavern with amazing sea view.

After we will make our way back to Athens.

Top Visits

  • Corinth canal
  • Ancient Corinth
  • Acrocorinth

CORINTH CANAL

The Corinth Canal is a canal that connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth and separates the Peloponnese from the Greek mainland, arguably making the peninsula an island. The builders dug the canal through the Isthmus at sea level no locks are employed. It is 6.4 kilometres (4 mi) in length and only 21.4 metres (70 ft) wide at its base, making it impassable for most modern ships. It now has little economic importance.

The canal was proposed in classical times and an abortive effort was made to build it in the 1st century CE. Construction started in 1881 but was hampered by geological and financial problems that bankrupted the original builders. It was completed in 1893 but, due to the canal’s narrowness, navigational problems and periodic closures to repair landslides from its steep walls, it failed to attract the level of traffic expected by its operators. It is now used mainly for tourist traffic.

ANCIENT CORINTH

Corinth was a city-state on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnese to the mainland of Greece, roughly halfway between Athens and Sparta. The modern town of Corinth is located approximately 5 kilometers (3.1 mi) northeast of the ancient ruins. Since 1896, systematic archaeological investigations of the Corinth Excavations by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens have revealed large parts of the ancient city, and recent excavations conducted by the Greek Ministry of Culture have brought to light important new facets of antiquity.

For Christians, Corinth is well-known from the two letters of Saint Paul in the New Testament, First Corinthians and Second Corinthians. Corinth is also mentioned in the Book of Acts as part of the Apostle Paul’s missionary travels. In addition, the second book of Pausanias’ Description of Greece is devoted to Corinth.

Ancient Corinth was one of the largest and most important cities of Greece, with a population of 90,000 in 400 BC. The Romans demolished Corinth in 146 BC, built a new city in its place in 44 BC, and later made it the provincial capital of Greece. Neolithic pottery suggests that the site of Corinth was occupied from at least as early as 6500 BC.

ACROCORINTH

Acrocorinth the acropolis of ancient Corinth, is a monolithic rock overseeing the ancient city of Corinth. “It is the most impressive of the acropoleis of mainland Greece. Acrocorinth was continuously occupied from archaic times to the early 19th century. The city’s archaic acropolis, already an easily defensible position due to its geomorphology, was further heavily fortified during the Byzantine Empire as it became the seat of the strategies of the thema of Hellas and later of the Peloponnese. It was defended against the Crusaders for three years by Leo Sgouros.

Afterwards it became a fortress of the Frankish Principality of Achaea, the Venetians and the Ottoman Turks. With its secure water supply, Acrocorinth’s fortress was used as the last line of defense in southern Greece because it commanded the Isthmus of Corinth, repelling foes from entry into the Peloponnese peninsula.

  • SUMMER PERIOD: 1 April – 31 October
  • WINTER PERIOD: 1 November – 31 March

Full: € 8,00 – Reduced: € 4,00

Winter: 08:00 – 15:00
Summer:

  • From 1/4 to 30/4, 08:00 – 15:00
  • From 11/4 to 30/9, 08:00 – 20:00
  • From 1/10/ to 15/10, 08:00 – 19:00
  • From 16/10 to 31/10, 08:00 – 18:00

Free admission:

  • Escorting teachers during the visits of schools and institutions of Primary, Secondary and Tertiary education and of military schools.
  • Members of Societies and Associations of Friends of Museums and Archaeological Sites throughout Greece with the demonstration of certified membership card.
  • Members of the ICOM-ICOMOS.
  • Persons possessing a free admission card.
  • The employees of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports and the Archaeological Receipts Fund, upon presentation of their service ID card.
  • The official guests of the Greek government, with the approval of the General Director of Antiquities.
  • Young people, under the age of 18, after demonstrating the Identity Card or passport to confirm the age.

Free admission days:

  • 6 March (in memory of Melina Mercouri)
  • 18 April (International Monuments Day)
  • 18 May (International Museums Day)
  • The last weekend of September annually (European Heritage Days)
  • Every first Sunday from November 1st to March 31st
  • 28 October

Amenities for the physically chalenged:

  • Disabled people have access to both the Archaeological Site and the Museum.
  • Tourist guides upon presentation of their professional ID card.
  • University students and students at Technological Educational Institutes or equivalent schools from countries outside the EU by showing their student ID..

IMPORTANT

All our tours are flexible it’s up to you to make changes according to your wishes

Admission fees and lunch are not included in the price of the tour.

Confirmations

You may receive multiple e-mails until you receive an e-mail starting confirmation your booking will NOT have been confirmed.

FLEET

Our company fleet consist of non-smoking luxury sedan taxis Mercedes Benz full air conditioned. All vehicles covered by a fully comprehensive insurance policy and licensed by Hellenic Ministry of Transportation and Communications.

All prices are quoted per car / not per person

Prices include:

  • local taxes
  • VAT
  • Tolls
  • Baggage charges

Prices exclude:

  • Entrance fees
  • Personal expenses (drink,meals etc.)

DRIVERS

  • The drivers are not a licensed to accompany you on your walk to the top of the Acropolis or inside any other site or museum.
  • If you require a licensed guide to tour the sites with you, you need to hire one additionally.